Course Catalog

 

Graduation Requirement

Subject                                                                Credits 

                                                                         English                                                                     4

                                                                         Fine Arts                                                                  4 

                                                                         Foreign Language                                                    3 

                                                                         Mathematics*                                                           4 

                                                                         Physical Education/Health**                                     1 

                                                                         Science***                                                                4 

                                                                         Social Studies****                                                     3 

                                                                         Theology                                                                  4

                                                                         Other Electives                                                         3 

                                                                                 Total                                                                                30

 

  

 

 

St. John Bosco Academy is a college preparatory school. Courses are offered at the college prep (CP) level and Honors level (H). Advanced Placement (AP) courses are currently not available at SJBA, but will be accepted for credit in exchange of (H) or (CP) courses necessary for graduation and included in the GPA. Honors Courses are weighted with a .5 added to the GPA for Honors courses. Elective courses will be accepted with prior approval and will have the designation (OC) Outside Credit. 

Grading Scale

prior to 2016-2017              2016-2017

A – 90 – 100                          A – 90 - 100

B -  89 -  80                          B -  89 - 80

C -  79 -  70                         C -  79 - 70

D -  69 -  60                         D -  69 - 65

F -  59 and below                  F -   64 and below

 

 

*Mathematics – 4 year credit must begin with Algebra I  

**Physical Education/Health - .5 credit for Physical Education and .5 for Health  

***Science – 4 year credit must include High School Physical Science or Physics, Biology, Chemistry, one elective credit in Physical or Life Science

                    (AP courses are accepted)  

*****Social Studies – 3 year credit must be in World History, US History, .5 in Economics, 5 in American Government  

  

 

 

At St. John Bosco Academy the high school curriculum encompasses both a Classical and Traditional approach.  The focus is on developing the whole person by elevating the soul toward God through our Catholic faith and rigorous academic pursuits. To this end, students take a wide variety of courses where all subject areas are intertwined in an effort for students to become fully aware of the interconnectedness of faith, reason, history, and logic. Students take a full course load culminating in upper level mathematics, science, history, literature, composition and rhetoric, theology, Latin, and performing arts. Both the study of Latin and the Performing Arts are compulsory at the high school level at SJBA as well as a deep study of our Catholic faith. 

 

 

 

Table of Contents

 

                                                                            SUBJECT                                                                               Page

                                                                             English                                                                                   4

                                                                             Fine Arts                                                                                5

                                                                             Foreign Language                                                                  6

                                                                             Mathematics                                                      7

                                                                             Physical Education/Health                                                     8

                                                                             Science                                                                                  8

                                                                             Social Studies                                                                        9

                                                                             Theology                                                                              10

                                                                             Other Electives                                                                     11

 

 

English

 

23.061071                Ancient Literature/Composition 9th Grade (H) 

Ancient Literature is the first course in the literature sequence at Saint John Bosco Academy. This course introduces the student to some of the most important works of Ancient Greek and Roman literature. Students will also make connections between ancient literature and later works by great authors. Upon the completion of this course, students will be familiar with some of the main examples of Greek & Roman literature and their use by later writers (notably Shakespeare). They will also be able to identify and explain the key features of epic literature, drama and lyric poetry as well as the   features of oratory and rhetoric, as exemplified in Demosthenes & Cicero. 

 

23.063071                  World Literature (H) 

This course is a survey of world literature.  We will read literature of the West and other locales between the fall of the Roman Empire and the Middle Ages.  This includes lives of great saints of the Church, studies on man’s struggles with political power, Arthurian legends, and Shakespearean plays.  Additionally, we will cover some works from China, Japan, India, and the Mayan empire, along with similarly themed Christian works.  The course will also include vocabulary lessons and a significant amount of writing. 

 

23.051071                  U.S. Literature (H) 

This course is a survey of American literature. It introduces the student to the foundational works of American literature and culture, and includes the study of multiple genre and literary forms. Novels, poetry, and several forms of nonfiction (essays, letters, autobiographies, speeches, etc.) important to the American experience are all parts of this course. In the fall, students will read primary sources about the debates surrounding the founding of the country, as well as classic works including novels, poems, and speeches from 17th and 18th century authors.  In the spring, students will read more classic works from Reconstruction to the present, with a focus on American ideals of justice and equality before the law.  The course will also include vocabulary lessons, public speaking, and a significant amount of writing. 

  

23.052071                  British Literature (H)  

In this course the focus is on British literature.  The fall focuses on four significant classics which take students through the end of the 16th century.  In the spring, students begin with Shelley’s classic Frankenstein, continue through Austen and then into the 20th century, through Chesterton’s major  Catholic work, The Everlasting Man, the speeches of Churchill, and into Orwell’s vision of the future in 1984.  The course culminates with Lewis’ The Screwtape Letters, as students discuss the purpose of  humanity’s journey through the ages to Jesus.   

  

               Fine Arts 

 

54.0211071               Beginning Chorus I (CP) 

This course is the compulsory, non-auditioned chorus/musical production class at Saint John Bosco High School.  This group is made up of both experienced and non-experienced singers.  Each student in Beginning Chorus I is provided the opportunity to study the fundamentals of choral singing, learn basic sight-singing techniques, understand basic musical theory concepts, and perform a wide variety of choral literature throughout the year.  Students will also study musical theatre and have the opportunity to perform and/or work on the technical aspects involved in a musical production during second semester 

 

54.0221071               Intermediate Chorus I (CP) 

This course is the second-level, compulsory, non-auditioned chorus/musical production class at Saint John Bosco High School.  This group is made up of experienced singers.  Each student in Intermediate Chorus I is provided the opportunity to develop the fundamentals of choral singing, learn basic sightsinging techniques, understand basic and intermediate musical theory concepts, and perform a wide variety of choral literature throughout the year.  Students will also study musical theatre and have the opportunity to perform and/or work on the technical aspects involved in a musical production during second semester.  

  

54.0231071               Advanced Chorus I (CP)

This course is the third-level, compulsory, non-auditioned chorus/musical production class at Saint John Bosco High School.  This group is made up of experienced singers.  Each student in Advanced Chorus I will develop the following skills:  independent singing of a vocal harmony, individual sightsinging on solfege, choral singing in three or more vocal parts, understanding advanced musical theory concepts, and performing a wide variety of choral literature throughout the year.  Students will also study musical theatre and have the opportunity to perform and/or work on the technical aspects involved  in a musical production during second semester.     

 

54.0232071               Advanced Chorus II (CP)  

This course is the fourth-level, compulsory, non-auditioned chorus/musical production class at Saint John Bosco High School.  This group is made up of highly experienced singers.  Each student in Advanced Chorus II will develop the following skills:  independent singing of a vocal harmony, individual advanced sight-singing on solfege, choral singing in three or more vocal parts, understanding advanced musical theory concepts, understanding of the historical context of the music performed, and performing a wide variety of advanced choral literature throughout the year.  Students will also study musical theatre and have the opportunity to perform and/or work on the technical aspects involved in a musical production during second semester.   

  

Foreign Language 

  

61.041071                   Latin I (CP) 

This course is the first course in the Latin language sequence at Saint John Bosco Academy. This course covers the first fifteen chapters of Wheelock’s Latin Students will be expected to master three noun declensions, basic noun case usages, adjective declensions, the present and perfect active indicative system, and various pronouns and prepositions. All Latin students are encouraged to take the National Latin Exam during the spring semester, which covers ancient history, culture, mythology, and derivatives in addition to Latin grammar and vocabulary. Therefore, this course will also include weekly supplemental instruction in these areas; although not part of the textbook, these topics are highly interesting, as well as very important for the understanding of the cultures in which Latin thrived.  

  

61.042071                  Latin II (CP) 

This course is the second course in the Latin language sequence at Saint John Bosco Academy. This course covers chapters 15-30 of Wheelock’s Latin, and introduces topics such as fourth and fifth declension, the passive voice, the subjunctive mood, participles, infinitives, and relative clauses. All Latin students are encouraged to take the National Latin Exam during the spring semester, which covers ancient history, culture, mythology, and derivatives in addition to Latin grammar and vocabulary. Therefore, this course will also include supplemental instruction in these areas; although not part of the textbook, these topics are highly interesting, as well as very important for the understanding of the cultures in which Latin thrived.  

  

61.043071                  Latin III (CP)

This course is the third course in the Latin language sequence at Saint John Bosco Academy. This course covers the last ten chapters of Wheelock’s Latin, and introduces Latin authors such as Caesar, Cicero, Vergil, and Ovid through unadapted, authentic Latin passages. All Latin students are encouraged to take the National Latin Exam during the spring semester, which covers ancient history, culture, mythology, and derivatives in addition to Latin grammar and vocabulary. Therefore, this course will also include supplemental instruction in these areas; although not part of the textbook, these topics are highly interesting, as well as very important for the understanding of the cultures in which Latin thrived  

 

61.044071                  Latin IV (CP)  Optional

This course is the fourth course in the Latin language sequence at Saint John Bosco Academy. This course will focus on the so-called “Golden Age” of Latin Literature; students will read and translate selections from Vergil, Ovid, Horace, Cicero, Suetonius, and Tacitus. As students read, they will learn about poetic meter, figurative language, and other elements of literary style. The readings will be highly contextualized, and students will be expected not only to translate the texts, but analyze them. All Latin students are encouraged to take the National Latin Exam during the spring semester, which covers ancient history, culture, mythology, and derivatives in addition to Latin grammar and vocabulary. Therefore, this course will also include supplemental instruction in these areas; although not part of the textbook, these topics are highly interesting, as well as very important for the understanding of the cultures in which Latin thrived. 

              

Mathematics 

 

  

27.061072                  Algebra I (H) 

Algebra is the branch of Mathematics that uses symbols to represent arithmetic operations.  Topic will include:  Properties of real numbers, solving Linear equations, graphing Linear equations, linear inequalities, systems of equations, exponential functions, quadratic functions, polynomials and factoring, rational expressions and functions, and radicals. 

  

27.063071                  Geometry (H) 

This course presents all the geometrical concepts in a traditional fashion to the high school student. The topics include: conditional statements, direct and indirect proofs, Pythagorean theorem, lines and angles, congruence, inequalities, parallel lines, quadrilaterals, transformations, area, similarity, the right triangle, circles, the concurrence theorems, regular polygons and the circle, Geometric solids, and nonEuclidean geometry. 

 

27.064072                 Algebra II/Trigonometry (H) 

This course covers topics in intermediate algebra, advanced algebra, trigonometry and solid geometry.  The course structure includes theory, mathematical methods and practical applications using real-world word problems that support natural science and engineering applications.  Topics include linear and quadratic equations, systems of equations, exponential and logarithmic functions, rational and irrational functions, quadratic relations and systems, higher-degree functions and complex numbers, sequences and series, probability and data analysis, properties of trigonometric and circular functions, conic sections and many practical word problems of different types. The integration of mathematics with the natural sciences is stressed to ensure that the student appreciates both the use of mathematics in everyday life, as well as the synergy between mathematics and science. All students are retested (as needed) to ensure subject matter mastery. 

  

27.067071                 Pre-Calculus (H) 

Pre-Calculus is the study of circles and parabolas and is extended to include other conics such as ellipses and hyperbolas. Trigonometric functions are further developed to include inverses, general triangles and identities. Matrices provide an organizational structure in which to represent and solve complex problems. Students expand the concepts of complex numbers and the coordinate plane to represent and operate upon vectors. Probability rounds out the course using counting methods, including their use in making and evaluating decisions. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.     

  

27.078071                  Calculus (H)  

 

Calculus is an advanced study of functions, limits and differentials with application in maxima and minima problems, area and volume, differential equations, and numerical methods of equation solving.  

              

  Physical Education/Health 

 

  

17.011071                 Health Education (CP) 

 

There are so many beautiful life lessons and connections to God through nature. His truth, beauty, and goodness are revealed so perfectly there and all are recipients of it even if they are unaware. Not only can nature be a place of prayer, meditation, and formation but it is also the first and essentially only source of food! Unfortunately, in today’s fast paced culture, there is a disconnect from where food originates, why exactly food is needed, and what types of food humans physically need. This course, studies food sources, the physical properties of food, the effect of food on bodily systems, historic food traditions, modern food practices, and the movement to get back to the true and whole source of food. By the end of this course students will have learned and reflected on Creation and their active role in it!   

  

36.01 – Physical Education is not offered on site and must be taken as an Outside Course credit. Appropriate forms are available on the SJBA website.

                         

 

Science 

  

26.012071                  Biology (H)

The Honors Biology class will focus on topics vital to an understanding of living systems.  The topics will include, The Science of Biology, The Chemistry of Life, Ecology, Biochemistry, Cells, Genetics, Evolution, Microorganisms and Fungi, Plants, Invertebrates, Chordates, and the Human Body.  Evolutionary theory will be covered in conjunction with the Church’s teaching in Humani Generis.  These topics will be covered in depth. Lab experiments will be done to help with greater understanding of the topics.  Safety is of utmost importance, and each student will be responsible for adhering to laboratory safety rules and precautions at all times.  

  

26.073071                Anatomy (H) 

The science of Human Anatomy and Physiology presents the student with some of the topics vital to the understanding of the structure and function of the human body.  The topics will include the systems:  Integumentary, Skeletal, Muscular, Nervous, Endocrine, Cardiovascular, Lymphatic, Digestive, Respiratory, Urinary and Reproductive. These topics will be studied in depth with lab experiments on each chapter.  Microscope work and dissections are considered vital to the understanding of Anatomy and Physiology, and safety is of utmost importance in requiring students to adhere to safety rules at all times. 

  

40.051071                  Chemistry (H) 

In Honors Chemistry students will learn and apply chemistry principles, concepts, and operations.  Students must think logically and abstractly, and use math reasoning to analyze and evaluate laboratory activities.  The basic tools of chemistry - mathematics, equations, and the mole concept - are introduced early and used frequently.  Students must be proficient in algebra and in analytical problem solving.  Writing skills are integrated into this course through formal lab reports, and an in-depth literature research during the first semester.  Working independently, students will learn  through reading the text, experimentation, observation, and problem solving.  

  

  

40.081071                 Physics (H) 

Physics is a natural science that studies the interaction of matter, energy, force and motion.   This course provides students with the necessary knowledge and skills to understand practical applications of Physics concepts, methods and mathematics.  Course topics include Classical Physics (Mechanics, Mechanical and Electromagnetic Waves, Thermodynamics, Electricity and Magnetism, Light and Optics) and Modern Physics (Special Relativity, Quantum Physics, and Nuclear Physics). Heavy emphasis is placed on solving real-world problems, laboratory experiments and independent study projects.  All students are retested (as needed) to ensure subject matter mastery.   

              

Social Studies 

 

45.000071                   Ancient History (H) 

During the fall semester, this course examines the great civilization of ancient Greece, beginning around 600 BC with the rise of the Lydian state, and concentrating on the rise and fall of Athens.  The course reads the great ancient histories of the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars.  It then examines Plato’s view of the ideal state.  Plato’s state can be compared to the actual Greek states and to our own government. During the spring semester, we will examine the pre-Christian and early Christian world as seen through the rise and fall of the Roman Empire.  We will cover the highlights of Roman history from the mythical founding of the city in 753 BC, the fall of the Republic in the first century BC, to the fall of the Empire in 476 AD.   

 

45.0803071               World History (H) 

Ways of the World instills a global view of world history in a manner compatible both with a Catholic worldview and modern academic opinion, thus equipping students to operate within and outside of the Church environment and framework while still keeping root in the faith. As such, the class' approach is diverse and presents each piece of information in a variety of manners, allowing the students to view the subject under discussion from various angles, uniting their knowledge under the umbrella of the Church’s pure intellectual tradition without ignoring the reality of other competing opinions. Through this methodology, the student's not only know, understand, and rationally grasp the entire perspective of history, but do so from a thoroughly Catholic point of view. 

 

45.0081071               US History (H) 

This course is a survey of American History. It introduces the student to the progression and development of the United States of America from the early Native Americans to the current dynamic and complex world leader that the United States has become. In addition to a strong concise narrative of the growth of the nation, we will examine primary source documents in order to provide the student with insight into the social, political, and economic influences that determined the course that the American People followed to bring us to the present. In the first semester, the course will cover American History from discovery and colonization through the end of the Civil War. In January we will resume the story with Reconstruction and continue through the aftermath of the terror attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. 

  

45.0570071                 American Government (H) 

This course is designed as a basis of study about how the American political system works. There is an extensive examination of the Constitution as well as of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government. Citizenship rights and responsibilities are emphasized, and the policy-making process is explored in depth. The students examine how a government is the resolution of conflicts in a way that enhances a nation's values and purposes.  

  

45.0610071                 Economics (H)  

Economics is a semester long survey of the American economic system covering units on Fundamentals, Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, International and Personal Finance concepts. Included in the course is a comparison of economic models and graphic analysis. The goal of the course is to prepare students to be effective business people, employees and consumers. This course is required for graduation and is typically completed in the 12th grade.    

              

Theology 

  

99.000071                  Introduction to Catholicism (CP) 

This course is designed to help students engage in discussions and activities in order to learn the basic tenets of the Catholic faith (and the rationale for them). The first chapter of the student text, "Called to Holiness" sets the foundation for the rest of the course. It follows a logical progression from there, which include the key concepts such as the existence of God and divine revelation, creation and original sin, Mary and Jesus, the Paschal Mystery, the Holy Spirit and the Catholic Church, Christian prayer, the sacraments (with extensive coverage of each one), morality, grace, virtues, free will, the Ten Commandments, the Beatitudes, and the person in relation to society. The comprehensive overview of the faith provided in this course will make future theology courses more understandable. 

 

99.000072                  Sacred Scripture (CP) 

This course is a year-long primer to the essentials of the Catholic Faith. Topics that will be discussed in this course include the nature of God and his Revelation, our relationship with Him, the Commandments, the Beatitudes, the Seven Sacraments, and the nature of the Church. The course offers a broad understanding of what it means to live the Catholic Faith and establishes a strong  foundation for future studies in theology, spirituality, and Church history.  

  

99.000073               Church History/Theology of the Body  

St. Peter requires that all Christians, "Always be ready to give an explanation to anyone who asks you for a reason for your hope..." (I Peter 3.15, NAB). As Catholics we are deeply rooted in an intellectual tradition that does not issue forth despite our faith, but naturally grows from it. St. John Newman, himself a convert, found the greatest apologetic (that is, defense of belief) for the Church to be the study of history. There is therefore no doubt as to the incumbency on every Catholic to study not only history and the defense of the faith, but to unite the two in a holistic manner only proper to the Church's unity. SJBA's Apologetics and Church History course seeks to inform students of the historicity of their Christian faith, while providing them the tools to investigate and derive proper historical conclusions in light of the teachings of the Catholic Church. 

  

99.000074              Morality/Apologetics   

 

At the heart of Christ's teaching is the mandate to love God and love one's neighbor. But how does one love? What does it mean to love? Catholics throughout history understood that Jesus was not speaking about having good feelings or even intentions toward others; He was upholding the Magisterial decree that the Christian life was one firmly rooted in and acting upon the moral and ethical Revelations of God. In order for Catholics to be able to live out their baptismal calling fully they must understand morality and ethics and, beyond this, have the ability to reason through the difficult challenge of modern thought on these topics. Catholic Moral Theology teaches students the basics of the Church's beliefs and teachings on morality and ethics, while providing them an opportunity to engage other perspectives from a uniquely Catholic point of view. 

 

 Other electives

 

99.999979                 Structured Study Skills – 9th grade only – non-credit class

This one semester course is designed to help 9th grade students transition into the rigor of high school curriculum. The students will receive advice on time management, study habits, and preparing for tests and exams. Time will also be given for students to catch up on classes if needed.

 

11.451071                 Digital Media and Communication

Introduction to the software, vocabulary and procedures for developing digital media/communication using online systems. Students will help develop and produce the two St. John Bosco Academy publications, The Trailblazer (yearbook) and the Gray Wolf Gazette (monthly newsletter).  Topics include photography, design, theme development, writing and more. 

 

54.999979                 Advanced Choral Prep – non-credit class

This course will offer students in grades 9-12 the opportunity to study both solo vocal music and advanced choral music.  Students will also practice advanced sight-reading skills weekly. The students in this class will perform at least one piece as an ensemble in the SJBA Christmas Concert. All students who wish to participate in District Honor Chorus and/ or All State Chorus Auditions should register for this course; however, participation in these events is not required for all students in the course.  An initial "screening" audition with Mrs. Wearne and additional fees are required for participation in Honor Chorus and All State Chorus.